Susan Coll

Book Review
The Washington Post
Connie Schultz’s ‘The Daughters of Erietown’ captures four generations of women in a hardscrabble Ohio town

Everything changes for 12-year-old Samantha McGinty in the summer of 1969. Her father, Brick, stops fussing over his Chevy each weekend, no longer spritzing the windows with water and vinegar and wiping them clean with old pages of the Erietown Times. This small change to the routine flags a more painful development set in motion four years earlier, when Brick made a wrong turn and headed into “the biggest regret of his life.”

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